Category Archives: what?

Feminist Fashion #3 NWS

Previous posts: 1, 2

February’s Vogue Paris has an editorial featuring models Lara Stone and Travis, photographed by Steven Klein and entitled “Lara Fiction Noire.”

The one clever thing is that there are no guns anywhere in the editorial, this attempt at noir fiction:

In this sub-genre, the protagonist is usually not a detective, but instead either a victim, a suspect, or a perpetrator. He is someone tied directly to the crime, not an outsider called to solve or fix the situation. Other common characteristics…are the emphasis on sexual relationships and the use of sex to advance the plot and the self-destructive qualities of the lead characters. This type of fiction also has the lean, direct writing style and the gritty realism commonly associated with hardboiled fiction.

The images (not work safe):

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it’s “it’s,” not “its”

sorry, Google:

Although as a reflection of society – more people must enter in “its” to cause Google to attempt to fix my “it’s” – I’m not sure whether this indicates that Google users have bad grammar or whether Google users are just extraordinarily lazy and don’t want to type that extra apostrophe. Probably both.

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not a good way to pick up girls.

Katherine Zoepf has been doing a NYTimes blog series on dating in Saudi Arabia. Her latest entry is about numbering – when Saudi boys drive in cars alongside the cars of Saudi girls and wave their phone numbers on cardboard and send Bluetooth messages, hoping to get some reply.

But I want to draw attention to this portion of the post:

I looked around. We were surrounded by several other cars, all containing young men and all trying to get the attention of the figures in the GMC, while simultaneously trying to edge each other off the road at high speed.

“Isn’t this getting a bit dangerous?” I asked.

“Yeah,” said Fahad. “Sometimes the girls get really scared, there are so many cars chasing them. Sometimes they’re in their car, crying and screaming for us to go away. It’s fun to make girls angry.”

Just in the sentence before, Fahad admits that the girls “get really scared,” but then he dismisses their genuine fear as getting “angry” and says that “it’s fun.” I’m sorry – can he repeat that again? “Crying and screaming” equates fun? I’m charmed.

This eerily parallels claims in the U.S. of harmless, fun, but ultimately very hurtful jokes. For instance, that rape jokes are funny. Or that fun can never hurt people.

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